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, educating kentuckyions about what the affordable care act is all about. our folks got in early and worked with the vendors on the website, and as you know, we had very few problems with it. and it's cranking out people that are joining up every day at the rate of about a thousand a day. we're now over 32,000 people who have signed up for affordable health care. >> you got on the ground floor. i mean, you wanted to do this, correct? >> i wanted to do this, but it was a two-part decision. you know, number one, is it the right thing to do. well, of course, it is. you know, expanding medicaid is the right thing to do. setting up our own exchange and not having kind of a cookie cutter approach that you would have to have at the federal level was the right thing to do. but particularly on expanding medicaid, i also had to be fiscally responsible. and i had to find out if we could afford to do this. and so i asked outside experts. i brought in some actuarial folks, and they took a good hard look at this and they came back and sat down and said, governor, you can't afford not to do this. >> what
. some of it must have been the result of his jesuit education and his experience as a debater. a friend of his is here who knew him and debated with him and told me that at 16, he was just a wonderful, great man, even though he was just a young man at that time. i never knew, really, exactly why he always knew the right thing to say and do. perhaps it was his honesty and his resolve to keep his word. i do not know. i think back on our almost 45 years together and i think of the long meanings -- meetings that perhaps best displayed his ability to reason with people. 'ability to reason with people. one of them was in the old -- in the late 1960's. he had accepted the challenge of a man whose name i think was virgil. who was opposed to any form of gun control. he claimed thanh was -- tom was for every form of gun control. , agreed to appear at this forum at this local high school. virgil as in the newspapers, "i was able to attract -- i think he also wrote on radio and television -- an audience of about 700 people, tom stood on the stage 45.5 hours and answered all of the allegations with
for this era to the well-educated, highly professional other hand i found myself drinking of two or three glasses of wine before, five, six. i caught myself quickly and went to rehab. >> what was that like for you? that realization. it's probably the worst thing i've ever gone through in the sense that i was full of shame, deeply humiliated by my behavior i didn't do any of the above but i did blackout each night before i went to sleep, and it was something i said get a handle on it. i have learned so much to alcohol in my childhood. i knew that i was addicted. and i found myself going for help but it was compounding. what is confounding is. >> host: like as a kid mirror mere month on the wall i am my mother after all. do you think that what you have experienced is pretty common with other women? >> guest: the extreme behavior that i was involved in was in the spectrum and i became addicted. i think the larger group of women are not addictive it's only about two and a half percent depending on the country how many are actually alcoholic could but there are involved in risky behavior that
rationale in many quarters, particularly higher education. the diversity rationale says we want to engage in special efforts to bring in people from all walks of life, all sectors, all regions, all ideological dispositions, all races. the reason why we want this is we believe that on our campuses there will be richer learning. there will be more learning, better learning, deeper learning takes place through the clash of perspective. and, you know, students will learn from one another. so the diversity rationale for affirmative action. that's some of the why affirmative action rose in the late '60s, early '70s but in these are some of the reasons that have been set for for affirmative action. okay. why is a controversial? affirmative action like all policies has cost. it has costs. what are some of those costs? there's a bunch just like there's a wide range of justifications, rationale, for affirmative action. there's also an array of costs. i'll mention a couple. let me start off with one, stigma. it's an important one because there some people, i think he neatly of the most vociferous cr
(footballnames.ecl) environment especially for a young children that they get good education, and in afghanistan it's impossible for the kids, especially for the one who is working with the american for their kids it's impossible to goe go to the schools or kindergarten to get education. but for here there is no more fear of taliban to get my children or harm my children. i you can sen can send them to s or kindergarten for a good education. >> i saw somewhere you said that in afghanistan they would learn to hold guns. here they will learn to hold a pencil and paper. >> yeah. janis when he got off the plane last night i asked him, what does this mean to you? my kids instead of having to learn how to predict and defend -- protect and defend themselves, when they go to school they will be taught to hold a pen and pencil and piece of paper. >> janis welcom well to welcomed states. >> straight ahead the surprising pick for the most powerful person in the world. and mariel hemingway talks about millions who need assistance now. we appreciate you spending time with us tonight. >>> up next is the golde
on the floor. >> wife is here in -- >> my wife is president for the state board of education for west virginia. she's here most of the time. she gets back a week, a month. she's back home. we have a beautiful place in tucker valley. we'll meet there. all back up to fairmont. i have two daughters up in pennsylvania. so about an hour and a half. we try to get the family together as much as possible. but it's difficult. i never thought i'd be this home sick. >> let me ask you about your kids. what do they think of their dad's profession. >> we have a lot of conversations, my kids are independent, very intuitive. they're into it. >> debate a lot? >> we talk a lot. the girls in my family are strong, very opinionated, very strong willed and all successful in their own rights. as mothers, career, people don't end well. situations on physical issues. that's quite a party. >> is there another office that you'd like to hold. >> i keep thinking, there's more work to do here to figure out. i'm comfortable being governor. ready and prepared here. how do you get through the toxic atmosphere and how do you g
. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. avo: sales event is "sback.hen drive" which means it's never been easier to get a new passat, awarded j.d. power's most appealing midsize car, two years in a row. and right now you can drive one home for practically just your signature. get zero due at signing, zero down, zero deposit, and zero first month's payment on any new 2014 volkswagen. hurry, this offer ends october 31st. for details, visit vwdealer.com today. ideolog ideologue >> time to take a look at the morning papers from our parade of papers. the raleigh observer a carnival rider is under arrest accused of tampering with the ride the vortex. five people were hurt at the ride. the operator face three felony counts for assault with a deadly weapon. the injuries happened when the vortex restarted as passengers were getting off the ride, knocking five people unconscious. three of them reportedl
. never cut act in education, never cut back on rock rooms for our children or seniors. we expanded for people in need. we had ourselves financially strong. i come here and my number one goal is fix the finances. raising debt. sooner or later, someone has got to fix the debt. i hope to achieve. i'm working hard across the aisle, talking to everybody. is there a way we can move forward and fix our debt? in they became engrossed bowls since approach. it was the only thing i sought that was bipartisan. one of the first things that i saw when i got here. bipartisan, state -- state bipartisan and grew bipartisan and we couldn't get a vote. i think you're 18 people and they needed 14 and they got 11. had sixthe last time we and five agree on a financial direction for our country and couldn't get a vote on the floor? what drives me. >> let me conclude on a couple of personal nose. your wife is here in west virginia. >> my wife is now president of the state board of education in west virginia. she is back home and i try to go back home on weekends. have a beautiful place in tucker valley an
to the future, we need to make it stronger by improving worker training and education, upgrading our infrastructure, and growing our manufacturing base. the truth is, there are additional things we can add and do to make america even stronger as a magnet for investment. before talking about what make ours economy such an attractive place to invest, and what we plan to do to make it even more atrabtive, i'd like to start by saying a few words about the state of the world economy. there's broad evidence of recovery across the global landscape. economic conditions, particularly in advanced economies, have improved, but there's no doubt that global command is not where it needs to be. in too many countries, unemployment levels are unacceptably high, especially among young people. as i said before, leaders around the world should make strengthening demand and creating jobs a priority to unlock growth that's robust, sustainable, and balanced. looking at europe, it seems the long recession is slowly fading even as critical steps have been taken to restore financial stability. this is good n
a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. help the gulf when we made recover and learn the gulf, bp from what happened so we could be a better, safer energy company. i can tell you - safety is at the heart of everything we do. we've added cutting-edge technology, like a new deepwater well cap and a state-of-the-art monitoring center, where experts watch over all drilling activity twenty-four-seven. and we're sharing what we've learned, so we can all produce energy more safely. our commitment has never been stronger. ♪ ♪ [ female announcer ] with five perfectly sweetened whole grains... you can't help but see the good. >>> for the must read op-ed. in the "wall street journal," progressive government fails. let us try to understand clearly what's happening now with the obama presidency. on display to everyone watching this week is not merely the failure of a federal website or a software program or miss sebelius's manage
, education and to create jobs so that everyone can live the american dream. americans deserve that. >> congresswoman barbara lee of california. thank you for your time. >> my pleasure. >> new surveillance video is showing a teen right before his bizarre death. coming up, more on his family's desperate search for answers may be recognized. >> and the man who with was about to jump off a bridge. in the nation, we know how you feel about your car. so when coverage really counts, count on nationwide insurance. because what's precious to you is precious to us. ♪ love, love is strange just another way we put members first. because we don't have shareholders. join the nation. ♪ baby... ♪ nationwide is on your side ♪ i started part-time, now i'm a manager.n. my employer matches my charitable giving. really. i get bonuses even working part-time. where i work, over 400 people are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than
-- not laid out specifics he said he wants to fund education with federal money through possibly expanding medicare. both candidates agrow however they want to create jobs and grow the economy. >> my tax cut plan which will grow 58,000 new jobs and reduce the personal income tax the 5%. and the business income tax to 4%. >> my opponent proposes $1.4 billion tax cut and resoundly criticized. it will come right out of education. early childhood development, reform in the sols. teacher pay. investing in community colleges. financial aid at higher ed. i think that's the prudent way to do budgeting. >> i like those too. i like education. i like puppies. but i don't bring a puppy home. i don't bring a puppy home if i don't have a plan for how i'm going to deal with that puppy. or guess what my house is going to look like. and he's all puppy and no plan. >> reporter: so how are voters feeling four days out? we talked to some of them coming up in the next half hour. andrea and mike back to you. >>> thank you. >> the woman accused of vandalizing the washington national cathedral and possibly the li
work, over 400 people are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. >>> the day before new jersey voters cast their ballots, polls show the governor chris christie holds a massive lead over his democratic challenger. it's an election that could put christie in very solid position for a white house run and it's an election that may have a big impact on the future of the republican party. cnn's erin mcpike is live in new jersey and joins us now. what does it look like there? >> reporter: well, wolf, chris christie was campaigning this morning in freehold, new jersey, which of course is the home of bruce springsteen but in the past four years, chris christie has become very much a rock star in his own right in this state, and i've got to tell you, he was getting that kind of treatment everywhere he went today. four years after he won in what was a squeaker, this race whic
-mails, out of our contact, out of our reading list, personal finances, education records, we want the government to stop wasting our money trying to prove that they are protecting us. in 1775, patrick henry said, give me liberty, or give me death. we demand life and liberty. we claim life, liberty, the pursuit of happiness as our rightful inheritance as americans. [applause] this was the promise of the declaration of independence written by thomas jefferson. to secure these rights governments are instituted among men and women deriving just powers from the government that goverened that whenever any form of government becomes described to -- destructive of these ends it is the right of people to alter or abolish it and institute new government. if these words, written by thomas jefferson sound radical today, it is because the u.s. government has buried far from from the spirit of july 4, 1776, a spirit not just of revolution, but evolution, of the awareness that the legitimacy of the state depended on the support of the natural rights of its citizens. we are here to reawaken that
services. the one thing we try to do in the aca is give more money for graduate medical education to encourage more folks to it to medical school. host: our guest, congress woman diana degette, serves the first district of colorado, democrat . she is the top democrat on the oversight and investigations subcommittee. we will go to paul next in pittsburgh, republican caller. hi, paul. caller: good morning. i would like to start thinking c-span for allowing us to have this unfiltered conversation that is important for the people to hear all of this. , ipent 30 years in the navy will be very brief. when the admiral was running an exercise, we would write the plan and then he would just call all the department heads in and go over all the details until he was completely satisfied that this was going to be executed properly. we call that leadership. it is an ingredient that apparently is missing in our government at the top level. it is inconceivable to me that you could after having the time that you had to roll this plan out to have this kind of a disaster, and everybody to deny knowl
in the country. shaquille o'neal praised his education reform efforts. >> i don't endorse many politicians but chris christie is different. he's working with me to bring jobs back to the cities and help kids in tough neighborhoods get ahead. he provided more funding for schools and giving more parents more choices and merit pay for good teachers. he's a good man -- excuse me, he's a great man. please join me in supporting chris christie for governor. >> joining me now daily beast senior political correspondent david freelander. i think the end of that -- excuse me, he's a great man. bringing up that charm shaquille o'neal has which is why people like chris christie rough around the edges but able to turn on this local loveable charm as some people would describe it. >> yeah, sure, that's a great endorsement, shaq has a 10,000 kilowatt smile that beams off the screen. it does seem significant that christie is able to appeal to people outside the republican base. >> let's face it, that could be set about any celebrity, george clooney or anybody down the list, but the significance or big surp
to quality education." tomorrow he'll be on the campaign trail with ron paul in fairfax. >>> three people are found dead in maryland -- in a maryland home. a county firefighter among them. tonight a love triangle may have lead to this murder/suicide. officers found the bodies of the 27-year-old firefighter andrew hoffman and his girlfriend marie hartsman inside hoffman's home early this morning. both were shot to death by baltimore city police officer christopher robinson. robinson then turned the gun on himself. he was a third generation firefighter who just last july was honored for safely returning a wandering toddler to his home. >> it shows that it was a tragedy. we were quickly able to determine through our evidence and investigation that this was a murder/suicide. a domestic type situation. >> he had been with the department since 2006. >>> erica grow is outside to tell us about the morning forecast. erica? >> it is going to be cool out here tomorrow morning, bruce, but not as cold as when you are leaving for work on friday morning. let's get a look at that wake up weather forecast
in the nation, one of the top three states in the nation. never cut back any education, never laid any teachers off, never cut back on any of our programs for our children, our seniors. we expanded programs for people in need because we had ourself financially strong. i come here, my number one goal, fix the finances, fix the finances. raising debts don't fix debts. sooner or later someone has to fix the debt. and that's what i'm hire. that's what i hope to be able to achieve. i'm working very hard across the aisle, talking to everybody, is there a way we can move forward and fix our debt? i really became, really engrossed in the bowles-simpson approach t was only thing i saw that was bipartisan. one of the first things i saw when i got here, bipartisan, stayed bipartisan and grew bipartisan and we couldn't get a vote. we were three votes short out of that committee. there was 11 people on it. they needed 14. they got 11 votes. five republicans and six democrats. when is the last time we had six and five agreed on a financial direction for our country? and couldn't get a vote on the floor. that
care allow, just as thousands say they are losing their current plans. >> getting more educational bang for your buck. do those college rankings really help finding the best college for your budget? >> coming up in sports, lebron james and the miami heat unveiled another championship banner. we'll have the heights in just a bit. conversation in a live town-hall event. sex crimes on campus, a special week of coverage and live town-hall on america tonight nine eastern. only on al jazeera america. (vo) friday night ... >> does the nsa collect any type of data on millions of americans? >> no sir. (vo) fault lines investigates what it's like to live under the watchful eye of the nsa. >> they know everything that you do, everything that you think, everything that you fear. they know how to manipulate and control you. the state has all the power. >> we have done more to destroy our way of life than the terrorists could ever have done. >> welcome back to aljazeera america. i'm del walters. in just about a half hour, the health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius is going to testify b
is brought to you by mcdonald's thanking baltimore educators with free premium roast coffee every tuesday. thank you from baltimore mcdonald's family. don, back to you. >> thank you. >>> penn state is paying millions to those abused by jerry sandusky. mike schuh is live with details. >> reporter: good morning, don. good morning, everyone. the number of known victims in the penn state jerry sandusky sex scandal jumped dramatically. in a nearly $60 million settlement it was disclosed that 26 additional young men were strong enough to -- enough to be included in the agreement. a local scholar says the settlement was the wisest role for the schools. the money is covered by the school's insurance. mike schuh reporting live. >>> a local man is facing charges for selling drugs on the black market web site known as the silk road. jacob george the fourth is charged with selling heroin and other drugs on the site which the feds brought down earlier this month. police make arrests following the fatal shooting of a hotel worker in oxon hill. surveillance video
every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. to roll out a perfectly flaky crust that's made from scratch. or mix vegetables with all white meat chicken and homemade gravy. but marie callender's does. just sit down and savor. marie callender's. it's time to savor. just sit down and savor. so if ydead battery,t tire, need a tow or lock your keys in the car, geico's emergency roadside assistance is there 24/7. oh dear, i got a flat tire. hmmm. uh... yeah, can you find a take where it's a bit more dramatic on that last line, yeah? yeah i got it right here. someone help me!!! i have a flat tire!!! well it's good... good for me. what do you think? geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. medicare open enrollment. of year again. time to compare plans and costs. you don't have to make changes. but it never hurts to see if you can find better cov
's handling of health care and education, many democrats simply ignored her. and they haven't continued to ignore their gubernatorial nominee. it's true that democrats were probably not ever going to win this race. christie is simply too popular, thanks in part to his definite handling of hurricane sandy last year. democrats could have prevented christie from the sort of massive victory that he could use as a springboard for a 2016 presidential run. christie's campaign has not even tried to disguise that they want to run up the margins in this race so they can tell every republican who will listen that the state who re-elected barack obama by 17 points turned around the next year and backed chris christie by an even bigger margin. democrats could have denied him that. they could have worked to keep buono close, to keep christie from gaining momentum, from a massive victory in a blue state. instead, christie has built a 33-point lead without putting up any real fight on the democratic side. and that could come back to haunt them once 2016 rolls around. joining me now is e.j. dionne, a "w
, educate, engage on subject matters that we think are very important. they can be money in politics, climate change, the state of politics, the influence of power in america, and, like i said, the early mission was, you know, we don't -- we are reporting driven. as you look behind me, i don't know what you can see out there, but we have ten reporters in the bureau alone. we have reporters in other places as well, and, you know, we don't focus on commentary. we don't focus on a lot of local analysis. we do some of that, but mainly we focus on stories we find important, things that are in the news and report them out in a way that is unique and different that's what's happening in the rest of the media, or they can be different but important that are not getting the attention that we believe they should be getting. >> host: what do you think the status of investigative journalism is today for magazines? too many magazines that focus on opinion writing? >> guest: well, i think there's a lot less investigative reporting. i use that praise not in a pa -- pejorative way. the news room and
would probably go abroad were you can get free education, free medical benefits, and not worry about the racial issues. host: if it is free, who pays for it to? caller: not sure who pays for the listening to your program and listening to other countries , i would less stressed at least give them an opportunity. you mean denmark, right -- right?er: caller: denmark. host: monti has this point -- you can call in to join the conversation -- do you feel you have the opportunity to get ahead in america ayako from michigan, jessica is up next. good morning. -- in america? from michigan, jessica is up next. good morning. caller: it is hard to get ahead in america when asians are taking our jobs here and taking our jobs overseas. the media believes we need a bunch of schooling to get ahead. i think that is wrong. host: thank you for the call. looking at the comparison of the chart we showed you from 1952 -- james is next from grand forks, north to code up. you say you do not have the opportunity to get ahead in this country, why? i have to say no i have to say that is where i come from. , c-s
. >> you know why i'm here, really, i'm an educator now. what way? >> i'm trying to educate people to this problem of a fib. >> it's an irregular heartbeat. >> this affects like almost 6 million people. >> so you know? >> i know. >> she's an educator. >> and if you have it, you're five times more likely to have a stroke. so go easy on yourself. >> i thought your heart was just beating 'cause you were here. >> i'm excited, but i'm very close to having a stroke. but if you want to know more about it, i want to send people to fibs or fact.com. take a quiz. like deal or no deal. for everybody that takes the quiz, not only do you learn something, but you end up -- >> i got a little problem. >> what? >> you're worried about giving people a sudden shock and there is 6 million people with afib, yet you want to stun people with your pranks show. and if someone has afib and on your prank show, without knowing it, you could kill them. >> or you could save their life. >> no. the point is, this is so common and if you know about it, you -- >> i didn't know. >> how did you find out? >> i was goi
. if you are turning 65 the number is about $500,000. and, in fact what we are trying to do is educate people around the world and we created a website which you can get on determine, actually what you need per month once you are 65 or older. it will tell you how much you need today or you can put in how much you have today and it will tell you how long that will last month by month. and this is very important that we get this message out that people need to invest now because in this survey the one thing we found and this is where wisdom comes in is everyone of the retires said they wished they had saved more for the future. >> it is worth reminding because people are spending more time planning vacations and thinking about which smart phones and cars to buy than they are about their retirement. how often should you be thinking about your retirement and planning for that? >> this is very important that you get invested today. the earlier the better because the money will work for you. because so much is sitting in cash earning 0 that over a 20 year period
we're going to invest in education and r&d at home and insure that the united states can compete and win in this highly competitive global marketplace. you and i know we can do that, but we have to make this a priority at a time of enormous pressure to drastically cut government spending. .. >> expected our ability to promote principles and values that our veterans sacrificed for. it didn't get shut of the statue of liberty, it temporarily closed the doors to refugees and students who are seeking visas to learn here and to contribute to our economy. they shut down delayed security aid to israel, one of our closest allies, obviously, and a critical democracy in a region that's undergoing tremendous upheaval. why would an would in common sey would you want to do that? a shutdown set hard-working public servants own, including officials whose job is to enforce the sanctions against iran, sanctions that actually helped to create the pressure that brought us to this moment of cautious possibility in the region. that shut down furloughed for norvell -- nobel laureates who were working
with the department of education. in it, 42 occidental students allege they were raped or sexually assaulted since 2009. >> it has been open season on the female students at occidental. >> the say day gloria allred threatened a civil the suit. students came forward with new accusations that the college treated assailants far too lightly. >> the person that rapped me was not responsible for raping three women, yet he's aallowed to come back. in may he shook the hands of college's president and received his diploma. i wish i had not been discouraged by a dean for reporting my rape. >> another woman also a junior told us she was raped last year by a repeat offender after a campus dance. >> there was drinking involved, and i ended up being taken home by someone that i actually don't remember being taken home by. i ended up having sexual relations with him without my knowing. i didn't remember it in the morning. >> did you report this? >> i didn't report it for two months. >> did this guy assault other women? >> yes. we know that he has been found guilty of sexually assaulting another woman. i think wh
. we want to eliminate, educate, engage on subject matters that we think are very important. they can be money in politics, climate change, the state of politics, the influence of power in america, and like i said, the early mission was -- you know, we are reporting driven. as you will see behind me, i do not know what you can see up there, but we have 10 reporters in this bureau alone. we have reporters and other places as well. we don't focus on commentary, we don't focus on a lot of political analysis. we do some of that. but mainly we focus on reporting stories that we find are important. they can be things that are in the news, and we report them out in a way that is unique and different than what is happening in the rest of the media, or they can be things that are totally different but are quite important, that are not getting the attention that we believe they should be getting. host: what do you think the status of investigative journalism is today for magazines? are there to me magazines that focus on opinion writing -- are there too many up magazines that focus on opinion w
but i choose them very carefully because they take four years of my life. they are a college education to the. >> host: are you working on one now? >> guest: well, i had hoped to do a book on the women senators, the 20 women in the united states senate, to see if ginger really made a difference. because this is the first time we've had so many. but i don't know quite how to do that. i wanted to answer the question, does jenna make a difference? yes, i think so far we see that they are more collegial. they certainly are more supportive of each other. they bind together. they have dinners. but i do know if it's only a matter of gender or because they are still a minority in an all male bastion. so kind of put the book aside for the time being. >> host: did you find similarities between the kennedy family and the bush family? >> guest: yes. i did find similarities. first of all, the obvious ones. the dedication to public service. however, the kennedy family was unique in that they had a master, a mastermind behind them, and that was ambassador joe kennedy. and there was a driving force be
. >> to go to a career school and get this type of education, this would cost you $20,000 and extra 11 months after high school. >> reporter: the classroom hare is a brand-new, state of the art dental lab. after a year and a half of construction, school leaders unveiled it today. it has new lights, equipment and dental stations. there's no other public school program in baltimore like it. >> i just love everything about this school. there's so many opportunities here. i mean, like you can get certified. when you graduate. >> reporter: while the students will learn everything they need to know in this lab for their certifications, next year, they'll get internships. they'll go to real dental offices, and get real-world experience. >> now. -- wow if they could skip that step and go straight to school of dentistry, wouldn't that be wonderful for them? >> this community has a lot of people who might not be able to get healthcare somewhere else that would be the best thing about this. >> reporter: and that means healthy smiles for everyone. i'm gigi barnett, wjz eyewitness news. >> the vivian t. t
on college drinking in the state. most maryland universities have alcohol education and basic training. but this collaborative takes it a step further. >> reporter: schools will develop multilevel intervention. targeting parents, students and the surrounding area. >> colleges don't exist in bubbles. you gotta work with communities to reduce the level of risk from alcohol use. >> the collaborative will provide approximately health expertise and assess which strategy will work best for campus. >> college drinking will go on. we can't make that go away. however, we can do things to help students function in an environment in which underaged drinking is going to happen. >> reporter: the collaborative will also host intensive training sessions. the next one is scheduled for early november. reporting live for wjz, linh bui, wjz eyewitness news. >> they host the collaborative. nearly a dozen other colleges participate. >>> if you're waiting for somebody to get home from work, let's check in on our roads right now, here's kristy breslin at wjz traffic control. >> hi, mary. hi, everyone. we're
he was in high school, to pay for his education. we're live, i'm rochelle ritchie, wjz eyewitness news. >> morgan state says it does not tolerate or accept and kind of discrimination. >>> orioles center fielder, adam jones, may win a golden glove tonight. but today was all about diamonds. jones' long-time girlfriend, announced the couple is engaged on instagram. she flashes a diamond ring on her left hand and writes, we're engaged. jones popped the question while the two were vacationing in paris. she is the daughter ever former envelope player, john fugate. congratulations to them both. >> that will be the bigger part of his day. the engagement, even if he gets the golden gov. >> -- glove. >> golden glove will mean more money. >> maybe so. >>> the president's twitter page is hacked. where two tweets sent followers, and who is behind it. >>> opening the lines of communication. how the death of a maryland man inspires a landmark program for people with development disabilities. >>> the annapolis city documents the green light. but not without opposition. i'm christie ileto, to exp
are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. hall we do is go out to dinner.? that's it? i mean, he picks up the tab every time, which is great...what? he's using you. he probably has a citi thankyou card and gets 2x the points at restaurants. so he's just racking up points with me. some people... ugh! no, i've got it. the citi thankyou preferred card. now earn 2x the points on dining out and entertainment, with no annual fee.to apply, go to citi.com/thankyoucards i have a big meeting when we land, but i am so stuffed up, i can't rest. [ male announcer ] nyquil cold and flu liquid gels don't unstuff your nose. they don't? alka seltzer plus night fights your worst cold symptoms, plus has a decongestant. [ inhales deeply ] oh. what a relief it is. [ inhales deeply ] (coffee be♪ng poured into a cup.) save your coffee from the artificial stuff. switch to truvia. great tasting, z
. we started our enrollment cam p -- campaign not to enroll but to educate people in advance. i went to 200 cities. we had bus tours and advertisements. some of this has been driven by the fact they may not have had the budget, i don't know. i do think they have trouble in being able to educate people. they have a lot of challenges. the first one is the technical problem. they have to solve the technical problems or they're never going to get to the numbers. you are right, what really is at stake here isn't whether or not they got their web site fixed. it's whether the pooling process that they've developed is going to work. you have to have enough healthy, young people in this pool to make it affordable for. >> else. >> governor, i mean, it appears to be actually worse than that. according to the front page of "the washington post" today, in some states eight out of tn of the people that are signing up are on medicaid. if you continue that sort of ratio, it's simply going to be seen as an expansion of the entitlement program. and a huge divergence between those states that have opte
education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. the end. lovely read susan. but isn't it time to turn the page on your cup of joe? gevalia, or a cup of johan, is like losing yourself in a great book. may i read something? yes, please. of course. a rich, never bitter taste cup after cup. net weight 340 grams. [ sighs ] [ chuckles ] [ announcer ] always rich, never bitter. gevalia. >>> a manhunt is under way for four escaped inmates that police are calling pretty crafty. the four made a daring escape from a local jail in caddo county early sunday morning. kerry sanders is standing by with the very latest on this. explain the crafty way these four escaped. >> reporter: well, very crafty because they found a hole in a system. but they found a way in a new system because the jail here is only really about a year old. $11 million spent for the new jail and the court complex here. the sheriff is here right now. sheriff gene cain, i'm sort of c
in the workforce. we need an economically growing immigration policy, a transforming education system, we need a strategically driven energy policy based on north american resources and american ingenuity and innovation. we need to have simplified taxes and rule making. to trust people once they're empowered to make decisions for themselves far better than having government do it. it's not too late. too many conservatives i think have given up. they basically are just reacting to the overreach and don't believe we can restore american grate greatness bit tried and true means. >> can you sell immigration reform to the gop? tough job. it's a tough job. >> there are a lot of people i talk to that quietly say i understand what you're saying, we need an economic driven immigration plan, i don't want to be primary. at the end of the day people are going to have to put on their big boy pants here and do what's right for the country. we could grow faster if we limited familyification and we placed it with a rebust programs. it's within our grasp and to me it's a completely conservative idea that we do
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